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NOTICE BOARD

 EVENTS


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COMING SOON

Historic Churches 2015

 

IN PRINT...

Cover image ot the 2014 edition of the Building Conservation Directory

The 22nd edition of The Building Conservation Directory brings together the latest expert advice and up-to-date information on craft skills, conservation products and specialist services, as well as full course listings, event details and other essential information. Both print and digital copies of the 2015 edition will be available at the end of January.

DIGITAL EDITIONS

The following publications are now available as digital flipping books for your PC, tablet or smartphone:

The Building Conservation Directory 2014

Historic Churches 2014

 

 

...AND ONLINE

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In 2014 this website received 70,000 visitors per month on average – see visitor statistics.


New Articles

Repairing Lime Plaster Ceilings

A semi-circular rib is added to a marked-up ceiling

For the Tudor nobility, installing an ornate lime plaster ceiling was a potent expression of wealth and status. Historic plasterwork specialist Sean Wheatley provides an overview of the historical development of plaster ceilings in Britain before going on to examine typical defects and appropriate repair techniques and materials.

Traditional Solid Ground Floors

Paul Watts and Gillian Tesh provide a lively and informative introduction to the subject of breathable solid floors. Their article includes guidance on the conservation of traditional breathable floors and explores the options open to specifiers of new solid floors in traditional buildings, whether in limecrete, modern slab, traditional earth or hybrid design.

 

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